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Friday, April 08, 2011

Poetry Friday--"Monadnock in Early Spring"


This is an interesting time of year--one day it's snowing, the next we're wearing shorts, and on a third we're shrouded in fog. But, no matter what the weather, New Hampshire is always interesting, if not downright gorgeous!
Monadnock in Early Spring
by Amy Lowell

Cloud-topped and splendid, dominating all
The little lesser hills which compass thee,
Thou standest, bright with April's buoyancy,
Yet holding Winter in some shaded wall
Of stern, steep rock; and startled by the call
Of Spring, thy trees flush with expectancy
And cast a cloud of crimson, silently,
Above thy snowy crevices where fall
Pale shrivelled oak leaves, while the snow beneath
Melts at their phantom touch. Another year
Is quick with import. Such each year has been.
Unmoved thou watchest all, and all bequeath
Some jewel to thy diadem of power,
Thou pledge of greater majesty unseen.
I'm ready to burst out walking. With all the snow piled up this winter, there was never any place to walk. I just may borrow The New Hiking the Monadnock Region: 44 Nature Walks and Day-Hikes in the Heart of New England by Joe Adamowicz [917.429 ADA] and watch the "trees flush with expectancy" one of these fine spring days!

The Poetry Friday Round-Up is being hosted by Madigan Reads. Madigan is a librarian from Georgia.

Photo by StarrGazr

4 comments:

  1. Yes! This does make me want to burst out walking. Lovely poem. Enjoy your walk.

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  2. When I was a teenager, my friends and I climbed Mt. Monadnock every Columbus Day. We drove up from Boston, and made the climb, and all the way up I asked myself why am I doing this? Never again.

    And then you reach the top and it's almost like having a baby. There's adrenaline and euphoria and a feeling of 'Isn't this the most wonderful thing in the world!'

    And that feeling stayed with you on the way down, so that now we took the time to see the stray flower growing up between the boulders, the moving rock that was really a mass of ants, the birds and trees that we had absolutely no interest in on the way up.

    Thanks for the trip back!

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  3. Yes! I love that line about the trees flushed with expectancy. This is a fabulous time of year!

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  4. How is it that I've never read this Lowell? I love "melts at their phantom touch."

    So glad you can finally get out and about.

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