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Friday, April 24, 2015

Poetry Friday--Spring Waters

Now that the snow has melted here in southern New Hampshire, and it continues to melt further north of us, New England's rivers and brooks are full to overflowing. The power of these rising waters is astounding!


Here's a poem from Wendell Berry that is found in Leavings: Poems [811.6 BER]:
Give It Time

The river is of the earth
and it is free. It is rigorously
embanked and bound,
and yet is free. "To hell
with restraint," it says.
"I have got to be going."
It will grind out its dams.
It will go over or around them.
They will become pieces.

Let us not forget that Mother Nature always has the last word!

This video was filmed in March 2010, in Deerfield, NH:



Coincidentally, Renée at No Water River is this week's Round-Up hostess. How can there be a "no water river"--what does it all mean? Renée's explanation of the blog name is found here.

7 comments:

  1. We've had our moments of the rivers wanting to 'get going', but not this year. He grabs a topic & writes it well, doesn't he? Thanks, Diane.

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  2. Right now the snow has been melting at the rate that hasn't led to flooding, however, if we get a few days of torrential rains, all bets are off! Sorry you missed the snow this year, Linda.

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  3. I like this notion of embanked and bound, yet free. One could take this in many different ways. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. That's why I like simple poems, they invite multiple interpretations since the writer isn't explaining things to death.

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  4. Love that "To hell / with restraint"! Rivers really can be strong-willed, can't they? And Mother Nature can be moody. Thanks for posting the poem, Diane. A day with Wendall Berry in it is a good day.

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    1. Moody? Tell me about it. Today, everyone was back in winter coats! I find so much to like about Wendell Berry!

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  5. Rivers (should) help us remember our irrelevance in the big scheme of things.

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