Thursday, March 16, 2017

Poetry Friday--William Butler Yeats

Since it is St. Patrick's Day, it is only natural to pick an Irish poet to feature, and probably the Irish poet most familiar to Americans is William Butler Yeats. Yeats not only wrote poetry, but he also worked to preserve the old tales and legends of the Irish people.


In our children's collection, Yeats' work appears in one of the splendidly illustrated "Poetry For Young People" volumes issued by Sterling Publishing (we about about 20 titles in the series) [J 821.8 YEA].

Of the poems presented, "To a Squirrel at Kyle-Na-No" is my favorite. The editor of the collection provided this helpful bit of information, "the Irish language place-name "Kyle-na-no" means the wood of nuts.
To a Squirrel at Kyle-Na-No

Come play with me;
Why should you run
Through the shaking tree
As though I'd a gun
To strike you dead?
When all I would do
Is to scratch your head
And let you go.

Don't go messing with any squirrels or leprechauns today, but do stop by Life On the Deckle Edge where Robyn is hosting this week's Poetry Friday Round-Up.

14 comments:

  1. Thanks for the information on the Irish language. I just received a tweet from one of my twitter friends in Ireland who said that he is celebrating today.

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    1. Shamrock green looks good on everyone!

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  2. What a fun poem! And I love the POetry for Young People series.

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    1. All the volumes are beautifully illustrated!

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  3. Charming poem. Wasn't familiar with the book. Thanks for sharing it today. :)

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    1. I hope you'll look for the series, it is really quite nice!

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  4. Cool series! I agree with Jama -- charming poem! Makes me think of the Scottish poet Robert Burns talking to a mouse.

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    1. "Wee, sleekit, cow'rin, tim'rous beastie..."

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  5. Great minds think alike - I'm sharing a bit of Yeats in honour of Ireland today, too! :)

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  6. Fun poem Diane, and I'll have to check out this series of Yeats' too, thanks!

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  7. What a great poem. I've felt like this about squirrels, too. Thanks for explaining about the name. I always like learning new things.

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  8. I'd forgotten this poem; thanks for sharing. And I did not know the meaning of Kyle-Na-No. We have a walnut tree that is a favorite of the squirrels. My grandkids have named the squirrels and can actually tell them apart. At least once every summer we mourn the tragic death of a squirrel on our street.

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  9. Perfect! - loved learning about the place name, too. Sounds like a great series. We raised an injured, fallen baby squirrel years ago - I always think of him fondly and hope he had a good life when we finally released him in spring. (He was a late fall baby. We had to take him far away from our farm, where our farm kitty had his eye on him....)

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