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Friday, April 14, 2017

Poetry Friday--"Song of the Rabbits Outside the Tavern"

Since it is finally spring and it's nearly Easter, and, since I saw a little rabbit skittering through my yard, I thought I'd share a rabbit poem today. This one is by Elizabeth Coatsworth (1893–1986). Coatsworth was a talented writer of fiction and poetry for both children and adults. She is best remembered as the author of The Cat Who Went to Heaven [J COA], which won the Newbery Award for children's literature in 1931. If you don't know The Cat Who Went to Heaven, I highly recommend you pick up a copy!

"Song of the Rabbits Outside the Tavern" is found in the anthology assembled by NH poet, Donald Hall, titled The Oxford Book of Children's Verse in America [J 811 OXF]:
Song of the Rabbits Outside the Tavern
by Elizabeth Coatsworth

We who play under the pines,
We who dance in the snow
That shines blue in the light of the moon
Sometimes halt as we go,
Stand with our ears erect,
Our noses testing the air,
To gaze at the golden world
Behind the windows there.

Suns they have in a cave,
And stars each on a tall white stem
And the thought of fox or of owl
Seems never to bother them.
They laugh and eat and are warm,
Their food is ready at hand
While hungry out in the cold
We little rabbits stand.

But they never dance as we dance
They have not the speed nor the grace,
We scorn both the cat and the dog
Who lie by their fireplace,
We scorn them, licking their paws
Their eyes on an upraised spoon--
We who dance hungry and wild
Under a winter's moon!

Dori Reads is the host of this mid-National Poetry Month, Friday Round-Up. Be sure to head there before you start this spring-is-finally-here weekend.

4 comments:

  1. Happy spring! Happy Easter! I love the rabbits and how they scorn the cat and dog by the fireside. I'm for dancing under the winter's moon.

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  2. The ending lines resonant with me, Diane-beautiful descriptions in this poem.

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  3. What a lovely image of rabbits and freedom--risks and all.

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  4. Rabbits really come alive in those lines.

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